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Outsider’s guide to…Perthshire

In just a few weeks’ time, the eyes of the world will be on Perthshire as Gleneagles plays host to the Ryder Cup. The best golfers from America and Europe will battle it out in one of the world’s most prestigious golf tournaments – and what better place for such a momentous showdown than Bonnie Scotland, the Home of Golf?

Whether you’re one of the tens of thousands of spectators descending on Gleneagles, or simply on the lookout for your next road trip destination, you’ll be pleased to know that Perthshire is home to some of Scotland’s most picturesque scenery. From charming villages to mountain peaks, lochs and walking trails, it’s the ideal place for lovers of the great outdoors. We’ve rounded up the very best spots in our outsider’s guide to Perthshire to help you on your way.

Gleneagles

Image by Gregory Stewart
Image by Gregory Stewart

 

The Gleneagles Resort boasts no less than three championship golf courses and is the home of Scotland’s National Golf Academy. Professionals and amateurs alike have travelled from far and wide to play here ever since The King’s Course first opened back in 1919, with its challenginglayout and stunning scenery proving irresistible to many. On the weekend of 26 – 28 September 2014, Gleneagles will take to the global stage as it welcomes The Ryder Cup back to Scottish soil for the first time in over 40 years.

The resort, recently voted the ‘Best Golf Resort in the World’ for the third year running, is also home to the five-star Gleneagles Hotel. Not only does it offer world class fairways on its doorstep, but guests can savour the delights of fine dining, award-winning spa facilities and luxurious suites.

Feel like treating yourself and loved ones to an unforgettable stay in this golfing paradise? Book a prestige car hire and roll up to the resort in a manner befitting golfing royalty.

Rannoch Moor

Image by Stu Smith
Image by Stu Smith

 

No trip to Perthshire is complete without a visit to Rannoch Moor, a vast 50 square mile area of peat bogs, mountain tops and rivers. It features some of Scotland’s most dramatic and unique settings, which attract walkers, cyclists, road trippers and photographers throughout the year. The area is home to an array of fairly challenging walking trails, but can also be explored by car thanks to the A82 road which crosses through the moor towards the town of Fort William. There are plenty of stopping points along the way that enable you to stretch your legs and snap some photos whilst taking in the panoramic views.

Glen Lyon

Image by Stu Smith
Image by Stu Smith

 

Glen Lyon is Scotland’s longest enclosed glen, stretching 34 miles from the small village of Fortingall to Loch Lyon in the west. Pick up a car hire at Edinburgh Airport and make the one and a half hour journey north to the town of Aberfeldy, which is just a short drive from the glen’s east entrance. It’s the perfect place to grab some breakfast or lunch before spending the day hiking over the glen’s many Corbetts; a term used to describe hills measuring between 2,500 and 3000 feet in height.

The drive through Glen Lyon is a joy to behold, as the narrow single track road snakes its way through the heart of the glen past quaint cottages and woodland. If it’s a warm day, or you simply feel adventurous, stop off at the Bridge of Balgie and take the plunge in one of the river pools. Alternatively, kick back with a tea and a scone outside the tea room and admire the spectacular views of the glen which novelist Sir Walter Scott once described as ‘the longest, loneliest and loveliest glen in Scotland.’

Kenmore

Image by Laura Suarez
Image by Laura Suarez

 

The village of Kenmore sits on the banks of Loch Tay, with tree-lined hills forming the backdrop to one of Perthshire’s most picturesque settings. To truly appreciate the area’s natural beauty, book a hire car in Glasgow and journey north to Kenmore via the town of Killin, which enables you to drive the length of Loch Tay before reaching the village. Take your pick from a range of outdoor activities including kayaking, canoeing, hiking, fishing or water-skiing.

Make sure you stop by Kenmore Hotel in the village square, which just so happens to be Scotland’s oldest inn with roots dating back to the 16th century. The hotel oozes history, from its ancient décor to the fireplace in the Poet’s Bar where Scotland’s most famous poet, Rabbie Burns, composed one of his works.

Pitlochry

Image by William Marnoch
Image by William Marnoch

 

Located just off the A9 with rolling hills and mountains in the distance, the town of Pitlochry is very much the gateway to the Highlands. The River Tummel weaves its way through the lively town centre where you’ll find streets lined with tea rooms, restaurants and shops.

The surrounding countryside is easily accessible and one of the most popular walking routes takes you south to the 60 metre-high Black Spout waterfall. The route passes through woodland and open fields before reaching the spectacular waterfall, with ample photo opportunities throughout.

In the mood for a Scottish road trip? Check out some of our other posts for more inspiration:

 

 

 

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